Public Talk: The Business of Conservation: Building Resilient Wildlife Economies

Thursday, September 23, 2021 - 08:00 to Friday, September 24, 2021 - 17:00

GAMIFYING NATURE CONSERVATION

This interactive session is brought to you by a team from the Luc Hoffmann Institute and Internet of Elephants who are looking at how to generate new revenue streams for conservation by monetisingwildlife data. Could games and gamification help reach new audiences and build a new community of millions who feel engaged in conservation? Bring your ideas and questions for what promises to be an original and stimulating session.

CIRCULAR ECONOMY AND BIODIVERSITY

An interactive session brought to you by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, where we will be looking at how the circular economy can play a fundamental role in helping halt and reverse global biodiversity loss. With more than 90% of biodiversity loss linked to the extraction and processing of natural resources, transformative change is needed in how we produce and use goods. Key insights will be shared about how the circular economy offers such a framework for transformation, redesigning the economy to help shape a nature-positive future. We will explore what this can mean for Africa and for wildlife conservation, through a stimulating session that looks at this from a practical lens!
 

RANGELAND CARBON - THE NEW KID ON THE BLOCK

Sub-Saharan Africa has seen the most severe land degradation in the world; 40% of grasslands across the continent can be classified as degraded. This is often caused by unsustainable livestock practices and overgrazing. However, reversing this trend through improved management and restoration efforts not only improves ecosystem services overall but also presents an economic opportunity through the generation of carbon credits. Marketable rangeland carbon is still in its infancy but is quickly gaining significant interest. This session will provide an overview of the approach, methods and opportunities this presents to the African continent.
 

TECHNICAL INNOVATIONS FOR ENGAGEMENT AND ENRICHMENT

We are currently in an era where very little of our daily lives are not impacted—directly or indirectly— by technology. Integrations and interoperability of technological systems, services and advancements in earth observation, the onset of the Internet of Things, distributed ledgers and our mobile devices hold a rich potential to transform the way we deal with environmental challenges. Never has there been such innovation and enabling factors as we now experience to help us better understand our world and the natural resources we rely on, and how we as humans could better engage as custodians. ‘Digital Transformation’, ‘Disruption’ and ‘The4th Industrial Revolution’ are terms so often bandied about, but what do these mean? More importantly, what do they mean for the wildlife economy?
 

SUSTAINABLE FINANCING FOR CONSERVATION IN AFRICA

How can we unlock the wildlife economy to promote sustainable financing for conservation in Africa? This session will look at this as well as include discussions on other innovative funding and financing options for marine and terrestrial conservation.
 

EXPLORING THE NEW ELLEN DEGENERES CAMPUS OF THEDIAN FOSSEY GORILLA FUND

For more than 50 years, the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund has been working in Africa to help conserve gorilla populations and support the people who share their forest home. In2017, the organization embarked on an ambitious project to build their first permanent home aimed at accelerating their work. This session will give key insights into the development of the new Dian Fossey campus, including looking at the sustainability of the campus, the importance of collaboration and partnerships and the potential positive impact on conservation.

COMMUNITIES AND THE WILDLIFE ECONOMY

This important hot topic session will look at the role of local communities in the wildlife economy and how they can be empowered to engage in, and benefit from, the wildlife economy. Lessons learned from 15 years of the Rwanda Tourism Revenue Sharing programme will be presented, as well as community conservancy examples from Kenya, Madagascar and Zimbabwe
 

INNOVATIONS INCONSERVATION ENTREPRISE

Innovative conservation enterprises across Africa are attracting new funding, generating new employment opportunities, and promoting conservation through responsible management and use. In this session, we explore a few innovations and consider whether these are sustainable, scalable, and replicable, such as wildlife-friendly enterprises and market-based schemes to pay for ecosystem services.
 

COVID-19 AND THE IMPACT ON THE WILDLIFE ECONOMY:LESSONS LEARNED

This hot topic session will bring together key experts to discuss the impacts of COVID-19 on wildlife economy activities, such as tourism, as well as the impacts on conservation in relation to this.
The importance of collaboration, sharing learnings and lessons from previous shocks, such as Ebola, and the need for innovation will also be discussed.
 

Downloadable info: